Separation Worldview to Interbeing World Presence

Transition from Old Story Self to New Story Self
The Sense of Self in the Old Story, the Space Between Stories, and the New Story

The human story undergoes a dramatic plot twist a few thousand years ago. A nomadic lifestyle of Interbeing World Presence morphs into a sedentary lifestyle of a Separation Worldview.

The “agriculturalization” phase shift that William Irwin Thompson outlines in his model of cultural transformation eventually grows into Civilization, Industrialization, and where we are now.

Where we are now is inside the narrative depths of what Charles Eisenstein calls the Old Story.

He writes:

“The world as we know it is built on a story. To be a change agent is, first, to disrupt the existing Story of the World, and second, to tell a new Story of the World so that those entering the space between stories have a place to go.”

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Walking is a Poetic Activity

Walking is often taken for granted in many of our lives, so we don’t take the time to look into how moving it can really be. 

Walking is not simply a form of exercise, nor is it simply a mode of transportation. It is an activity that includes both these aspects but extends far beyond.

In this post I’ll explore some of those larger meanings, in particular what travel writer Bruce Chatwin called “the sacramental aspects of walking.”

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On Bruce Chatwin Meeting Werner Herzog

Bruce Chatwin

In the introduction of Bruce Chatwin’s book What Am I Doing Here, he warns us with a simple passage:

“The word ‘story’ is intended to alert the reader to the fact that, however closely the narrative may fit the facts, the fictional process has been at work.”

This doesn’t mean that the essays and stories collected in the anthology are all lies, but rather that, perhaps, they’re aiming for what the filmmaker Werner Herzog calls ecstatic truth.

In an interview with Speigel Online, Herzog says “Facts per se are not so interesting for me. Facts do not illuminate; they create norms. The Manhattan phone directory has 4 million entries which are factually correct, but as a book it doesn’t really illuminate you.”

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How to Wander With Purpose

Travel takes many forms and styles –from low-budget to luxury, short-term to no-end, solo wandering to group tours, and little planning to overbooked itinerary.

Meaningful Lostness works best for a vagabonding style of travel that skews toward an open time-frame and low-budget. Rolf Pott’s in his book Vagabonding describes it as such:

“Vagabonding is an attitude—a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word. Vagabonding is not a lifestyle, nor is it a trend. It’s just an uncommon way of looking at life—a value adjustment from which action naturally follows. And, as much as anything, vagabonding is about time—our only real commodity—and how we choose to use it.”

In an earlier post we explored this idea of Meaningful Lostness, of allowing meaning to emerge within the dynamic tension between Structure and Spontaneity. In this post we will explore some ways to do it. For the sake of using capital letters and grand names, lets call it The Art of Purposeful Wandering.

Below are 5 ways to practice that art.

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Mexico: Gifts and Risks of Hitchhiking

Travel isn’t just about where you go, it’s about how you get there.

Travel involves many types of movement and the movement-choices we make determine, in large part, how moving our travels become.

Hitch-hiking, according to hitchwiki.org, is “a form of transport, in which the traveller tries to get a lift (a ride) from another traveller, usually a car or truck driver, for free.”

On the side of the road with a backpack strapped on, thumbs up and a smile is a thrilling way to move about the world. Continue reading

How to Be a Time Mime

time mime

Time is incredibly important in life.

If life operates upon the principles of music, as Alan Watts suggests, then time is like a dance to that music. Although each person is unique in how they dance and how they perceive rhythm, there exists common patterns between people living in the same place and culture.

Time is something we wear; it’s something we act out. It’s always with us until we are not us anymore because the ol’ Fates have stopped by to end our hours.

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Meaningful Lostness

Tree Lost

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote “not all those who wander are lost.”

This great line brings inspiration to countless wanderers trotting across the globe, including many nomadic 20-somethings seeking a poetic justification for meandering about life without a stable career.  No worries, since this includes yours truly…

Look no further — I’ve got you covered! (alright look a bit further; specifically below, where the covering is done).

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Comfort, Solitude, and Why It Matters for Travel

Witold Rybczynksi was uncomfortable.

Uncomfortable with the fact that comfort was left out of his architectural education. It made no sense — but that didn’t stop them from charging far too many cents to get the diploma! Anyways that curious omission made him, well, curious and that curiosity (after killing the cat) sparked an interest and that interest grew into a book and that book charted the historical progression of one question: Continue reading