Separation Worldview to Interbeing World Presence

Transition from Old Story Self to New Story Self
The Sense of Self in the Old Story, the Space Between Stories, and the New Story

The human story undergoes a dramatic plot twist a few thousand years ago. A nomadic lifestyle of Interbeing World Presence morphs into a sedentary lifestyle of a Separation Worldview.

The “agriculturalization” phase shift that William Irwin Thompson outlines in his model of cultural transformation eventually grows into Civilization, Industrialization, and where we are now.

Where we are now is inside the narrative depths of what Charles Eisenstein calls the Old Story.

He writes:

“The world as we know it is built on a story. To be a change agent is, first, to disrupt the existing Story of the World, and second, to tell a new Story of the World so that those entering the space between stories have a place to go.”

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An Inspired Reason For Schooling

“Public education does not serve a public” Neil Postman writes in his book The End of Education: Redefining the Value of School , “It creates one.”

And the one it creates, at least in the United States, is one bound by  “false gods.” These tiny deities often go unnoticed but that doesn’t mean their effects are unnoticeable.

As the subtitle suggests, purpose is what Postman’s book is all about.

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How Childhood Can Disappear

childmedieval

Childhood has been around forever, right?

That de-facto assumption was dismantled in the early 1980s by Neil Postman in his book The Disappearance of Childhood. “Childhood is a social artifact, not a biological category” Postman writes:

“In fact, if we take the word children to mean a special class of people somewhere between the ages of seven and, say, seventeen, requiring special forms of nurturing and protection, and believed to be qualitatively different from adults, then there is ample evidence that children have existed for less than four hundred years.”

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Education and the Stream of Life

As you probably already know — depending upon who you are and what you know — there are planeloads of problems with this thing called “the educational system.” Some of if I explore in a previous post.

A lot of it has to do with the technical aspects of how it’s carried out and a lot of it has to do with the philosophical aspects of why it’s undertaken.

These problems are not new. Over 30,000 days (and a similar amount of moons) ago, the polymath ahead-of-the-game thinker Alfred North Whitehead gave a bunch of lectures that were collected into a book named The Aims of Education.

In it he, as you might have guessed, works out the aims of education.

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