How to Wander With Purpose

Travel takes many forms and styles –from low-budget to luxury, short-term to no-end, solo wandering to group tours, and little planning to overbooked itinerary.

Meaningful Lostness works best for a vagabonding style of travel that skews toward an open time-frame and low-budget. Rolf Pott’s in his book Vagabonding describes it as such:

“Vagabonding is an attitude—a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word. Vagabonding is not a lifestyle, nor is it a trend. It’s just an uncommon way of looking at life—a value adjustment from which action naturally follows. And, as much as anything, vagabonding is about time—our only real commodity—and how we choose to use it.”

In an earlier post we explored this idea of Meaningful Lostness, of allowing meaning to emerge within the dynamic tension between Structure and Spontaneity. In this post we will explore some ways to do it. For the sake of using capital letters and grand names, lets call it The Art of Purposeful Wandering.

Below are 5 ways to practice that art.

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Meaningful Lostness

Tree Lost

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote “not all those who wander are lost.”

This great line brings inspiration to countless wanderers trotting across the globe, including many nomadic 20-somethings seeking a poetic justification for meandering about life without a stable career.  No worries, since this includes yours truly…

Look no further — I’ve got you covered! (alright look a bit further; specifically below, where the covering is done).

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